Put on your scrubs.

Healer's life.
Sexy veins and arteries!

Sexy veins and arteries!

scienceyoucanlove:

In 2008, Sherrie Walters was diagnosed with aggressive basal cell cancer, and had to have part of her ear, skull, and ear canal removed.But she has been the first patient to receive a new procedure that uses rib cartilage to build an entirely new ear, spearheaded by Dr. Patrick Byrne, a plastic and reconstructive surgeon. The new ear was then placed under the skin of her arm for months to grow."In my opinion, how it’s just a matter of time as the swelling goes down and it heals, I believe she will have a normal looking ear."Which is incredible! Reconstructive surgery like this is one, among others, is one of the best and most human uses of all the scientific might we have at our disposal.Read more here:http://dailym.ai/1tASBpK
source

scienceyoucanlove:

In 2008, Sherrie Walters was diagnosed with aggressive basal cell cancer, and had to have part of her ear, skull, and ear canal removed.

But she has been the first patient to receive a new procedure that uses rib cartilage to build an entirely new ear, spearheaded by Dr. Patrick Byrne, a plastic and reconstructive surgeon. The new ear was then placed under the skin of her arm for months to grow.

"In my opinion, how it’s just a matter of time as the swelling goes down and it heals, I believe she will have a normal looking ear."

Which is incredible! Reconstructive surgery like this is one, among others, is one of the best and most human uses of all the scientific might we have at our disposal.

Read more here:
http://dailym.ai/1tASBpK

source

medicalwatson:

sixpenceee:

If you thought the post on twins sharing consciousness was awesome, wait until you hear this.

A 44-year-old French man one day went to the trip to the doctor’s because he felt a pain in his left leg. He’s a married man with two kids and a steady job.

Doctor’s found that he had hydrocephalus as a child (when your brain is filled with fluids) so they decided to run some brain scans.

What they found was that the majority of his head was filled with fluid. Over time, the buildup caused his lateral ventricles to swell so much that his brain had been flattened to a thin sheet.

Doctors estimated that his brain mass had been reduced by at most 70%, affecting the areas in charge of motion, language, emotion, and, well, everything.

Shockingly, he was fine. While his IQ was only 75, he wasn’t mentally challenged. He held a steady job, raised a family, and didn’t have trouble interacting with others.

Over time, his brain had adapted to all that pressure, and even though he had fewer neurons that most, Jacques was still a fully functional human being.

The doctors drained the fluid and while his brain is much smaller now, he is still a healthy individual with a normal life.

SOURCE

WHAT

(via lysiacardilla)

hackelini:

Some pictures from the Body Worlds exhibit! There was much much more and a lot of explanation for organs’ duties, how cells work and the like and
it was just very interesting and exciting. The atmosphere there sure was one of a kind

(via themanfrombeyond)

kenobi-wan-obi:


The Gut-Brain Connection

Have you ever had a “gut-wrenching” experience? Do certain situations make you “feel nauseous”? Have you ever felt “butterflies” in your stomach? We use these expressions for a reason. The gastrointestinal tract is sensitive to emotion. Anger, anxiety, sadness, elation — all of these feelings (and others) can trigger symptoms in the gut.
The brain has a direct effect on the stomach. For example, the very thought of eating can release the stomach’s juices before food gets there. This connection goes both ways. A troubled intestine can send signals to the brain, just as a troubled brain can send signals to the gut. Therefore, a person’s stomach or intestinal distress can be the cause or the product of anxiety, stress, or depression. That’s because the brain and the gastrointestinal (GI) system are intimately connected — so intimately that they should be viewed as one system.
This is especially true in cases where a person experiences gastrointestinal upset with no obvious physical cause. For such functional GI disorders, it is difficult to try to heal a distressed gut without considering the role of stress and emotion..
Stress and the functional GI disorders
Given how closely the gut and brain interact, it becomes easier to understand why you might feel nauseated before giving a presentation, or feel intestinal pain during times of stress. That doesn’t mean, however, that functional gastrointestinal illnesses are imagined or “all in your head.” Psychology combines with physical factors to cause pain and other bowel symptoms. Psychosocial factors influence the actual physiology of the gut, as well as symptoms. In other words, stress (or depression or other psychological factors) can affect movement and contractions of the GI tract, cause inflammation, or make you more susceptible to infection.
In addition, research suggests that some people with functional GI disorders perceive pain more acutely than other people do because their brains do not properly regulate pain signals from the GI tract. Stress can make the existing pain seem even worse.
Based on these observations, you might expect that at least some patients with functional GI conditions might improve with therapy to reduce stress or treat anxiety or depression. And sure enough, a review of 13 studies showed that patients who tried psychologically based approaches had greater improvement in their digestive symptoms compared with patients who received conventional medical treatment.
Is stress causing your symptoms?
Are your stomach problems — such as heartburn, abdominal cramps, or loose stools — related to stress? Watch for these other common symptoms of stress and discuss them with your doctor. Together you can come up with strategies to help you deal with the stressors in your life, and also ease your digestive discomforts.
Physical symptoms
Stiff or tense muscles, especially in the neck and shoulders, Headaches, Sleep problems, Shakiness or tremors, Recent loss of interest in sex, Weight loss or gain, Restlessness
Behavioral symptoms
Procrastination, Grinding teeth, Difficulty completing work assignments, Changes in the amount of alcohol or food you consume, Taking up smoking, or smoking more than usual, Increased desire to be with or withdraw from others, Rumination (frequent talking or brooding about stressful situations)
Emotional symptoms
Crying, Overwhelming sense of tension or pressure, Trouble relaxing, Nervousness, Quick temper, Depression, Poor concentration, Trouble remembering things, Loss of sense of humor, Indecisiveness

kenobi-wan-obi:

The Gut-Brain Connection

Have you ever had a “gut-wrenching” experience? Do certain situations make you “feel nauseous”? Have you ever felt “butterflies” in your stomach? We use these expressions for a reason. The gastrointestinal tract is sensitive to emotion. Anger, anxiety, sadness, elation — all of these feelings (and others) can trigger symptoms in the gut.

The brain has a direct effect on the stomach. For example, the very thought of eating can release the stomach’s juices before food gets there. This connection goes both ways. A troubled intestine can send signals to the brain, just as a troubled brain can send signals to the gut. Therefore, a person’s stomach or intestinal distress can be the cause or the product of anxiety, stress, or depression. That’s because the brain and the gastrointestinal (GI) system are intimately connected — so intimately that they should be viewed as one system.

This is especially true in cases where a person experiences gastrointestinal upset with no obvious physical cause. For such functional GI disorders, it is difficult to try to heal a distressed gut without considering the role of stress and emotion..

Stress and the functional GI disorders

Given how closely the gut and brain interact, it becomes easier to understand why you might feel nauseated before giving a presentation, or feel intestinal pain during times of stress. That doesn’t mean, however, that functional gastrointestinal illnesses are imagined or “all in your head.” Psychology combines with physical factors to cause pain and other bowel symptoms. Psychosocial factors influence the actual physiology of the gut, as well as symptoms. In other words, stress (or depression or other psychological factors) can affect movement and contractions of the GI tract, cause inflammation, or make you more susceptible to infection.

In addition, research suggests that some people with functional GI disorders perceive pain more acutely than other people do because their brains do not properly regulate pain signals from the GI tract. Stress can make the existing pain seem even worse.

Based on these observations, you might expect that at least some patients with functional GI conditions might improve with therapy to reduce stress or treat anxiety or depression. And sure enough, a review of 13 studies showed that patients who tried psychologically based approaches had greater improvement in their digestive symptoms compared with patients who received conventional medical treatment.

Is stress causing your symptoms?

Are your stomach problems — such as heartburn, abdominal cramps, or loose stools — related to stress? Watch for these other common symptoms of stress and discuss them with your doctor. Together you can come up with strategies to help you deal with the stressors in your life, and also ease your digestive discomforts.

Physical symptoms

Stiff or tense muscles, especially in the neck and shoulders, Headaches, Sleep problems, Shakiness or tremors, Recent loss of interest in sex, Weight loss or gain, Restlessness

Behavioral symptoms

Procrastination, Grinding teeth, Difficulty completing work assignments, Changes in the amount of alcohol or food you consume, Taking up smoking, or smoking more than usual, Increased desire to be with or withdraw from others, Rumination (frequent talking or brooding about stressful situations)

Emotional symptoms

Crying, Overwhelming sense of tension or pressure, Trouble relaxing, Nervousness, Quick temper, Depression, Poor concentration, Trouble remembering things, Loss of sense of humor, Indecisiveness

(via afro-dominicano)

The corpus callosum is a thick band of nerve fibers that divides the cerebrum into left and right hemispheres. It connects the left and right sides of the brain allowing for communication between both hemispheres. The corpus callosum transfers motor, sensory, and cognitive information between the brain hemispheres.

Function:

The corpus callosum is involved in several functions of the body including:
  • Communication Between Brain Hemispheres
  • Eye Movement
  • Maintaining the Balance of Arousal and Attention
  • Tactile Localization
compoundfractur:

Hemopericardium is when the pericardium around your heart fills up with blood (typically from some sort of trauma). As you can imagine, if that sac fills up with blood it’s going to put pressure on the heart, not allow it to freely contract and relax and kill you (that’s called cardiac tamponade). Here we see an unopened pericardium filled with blood.

compoundfractur:

Hemopericardium is when the pericardium around your heart fills up with blood (typically from some sort of trauma). As you can imagine, if that sac fills up with blood it’s going to put pressure on the heart, not allow it to freely contract and relax and kill you (that’s called cardiac tamponade). Here we see an unopened pericardium filled with blood.

(Source: wikidoc.org, via lonewalker)